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Latest News

We are pleased to announce that our scheme for 60 dwellings at Irthlingborough has now received planning consent.

LLC1059_103_COLOURED_LAYOUT Web

We are pleased to announce that our scheme for 60 dwellings at Irthlingborough has now received planning consent.

Our client Hazelton Homes has an enviable reputation for building individual elegant homes. Over the last 20 years, Hazelton have been building in carefully hand picked locations in Leicestershire and Rutland, Northamptonshire, and Lincolnshire. Hazelton pride themselves on delivering homes of outstanding build quality, designed for today’s lifestyle.

 

 

LLC1059_103 COLOURED LAYOUT IRTHLINGBOROUGH

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Northern Powerhouse deciding more major schemes than the capital

planning

Fifth annual planning survey by the British Property Federation and GL Hearn finds that the Northern Powerhouse is delivering more major planning application decisions per capita than Greater London…

The fifth annual planning survey, published this week by the British Property Federation and GL Hearn, has found that the Northern Powerhouse is delivering more planning decisions per capita than Greater London.

For the first time, the research examined major application decisions across 25 boroughs in the Northern Powerhouse, showing that they made 11 major planning application decisions per 100,000 residents, compared to nine decisions per 100,000 residents in Greater London.

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Builders warn new water charges could delay and curb new housing

planning

Home Builders Federation complain that Ofwat’s proposed charging regime changes for new water and sewerage connections will cause huge increases in costs for developers…

House-builders have cried foul over the latest changes to the charging regime proposed by economic water regulator Ofwat for new water and sewerage connections.

Developers have claimed that the proposals, the subject of a recent consultation exercise, have the potential to result in “huge increases” in costs for developers as well as delaying the delivery of new homes.

Trade body the Home Builders Federation (HBF) has complained that the latest proposals allow individual water-only and water and sewerage companies too much freedom in setting charges. “The current proposals area nothing more than a weak, directional protocol that will leave the water companies free to carry on as before” stated the HBF.

The house-builders have warned that the new charging regime will take the sector back to the infrastructure “free for all” that occurred in the period immediately following water privatisation in 1989.

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Planning round-up 8 September 2016

planning

Neighbourhood Planning Bill published. Parliament says health should be a ‘material consideration’ for planning proposals. Moorland transformation. New Welsh flood advice. And more stories…

Neighbourhood Planning Bill published

The government this week (7 September) published its latest planning-related legislation in the guise of a Neighbourhood Planning Bill.

Contrary to the Queens Speech announcement in May the name of the bill has been changed. It no longer contains infrastructure in the title and the legislation itself does not include provisions about the National Infrastructure Commission.

The Bill includes measures to simplify and speed up neighbourhood planning, a substantive package on compulsory purchase orders, simplified pre-commencement conditions and a new requirement for local planning authorities to capture data on permitted development approvals.

View the press release

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English housing completions rise by six per cent

planning

The latest house building data shows that 139,030 new homes were completed in the year to June 2016, although housing delivery remains short of the rate needed to meet the government’s target…

The number of newly built homes in England has increased by six per cent in the past year, according to the latest figures published by the government.

The latest house building data shows that 139,030 new homes were completed and more than 144,280 homes were started in the year to June 2016.

Meanwhile, figures from the Council of Mortgage Lenders show there are more first-time buyers than at any time since 2007, with 72,800 in England in the second quarter of 2016.

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Oxfordshire housing scheme allowed by SoS

planning

260 home development on the edge of the Oxfordshire town of Witney has been allowed on appeal after it was originally refused because of safety concerns…

Communities Secretary Sajid Javid has approved on appeal a development of 260 homes (initially 270 dwellings) on the edge of the Oxfordshire town of Witney originally refused by the planning authority on a number of grounds including safety concerns.

The farm land site within the valley of the River Windrush on the north-western flank of the town is adjacent to a hazardous installation, a liquefied petroleum gas bottling depot run by energy company Flogas.

Safety watchdog the Health and Safety Executive had originally advised against the development but changed its view when the number of dwellings was reduced and the distance of the nearest housing to the depot increased. The inspector who held the recovered appeal into Gladman Developments Ltd’s outline proposals had recommended that the appeal should be allowed.

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UK’s biggest sustainable urban drainage system proposed for capital location

planning

£17m sustainable urban drainage project, designed to capture rainwater and channel it into the river Thames, has been proposed for the Nine Elms South Bank regeneration area…

The biggest sustainable urban drainage system (SuDS) in the UK, an ambitious new project designed to dramatically cut the amount of clean rain water mixing with sewage, is set to be launched this summer across the Nine Elms South Bank regeneration area.

Rainwater landing on an area the size of 20 football pitches will be channelled back into the Thames to stop it entering the capital’s overstretched sewers where it would mix with raw sewage.

This will reduce flood risks and save the huge amount of energy and cost involved in treating rainwater after it combines with waste from sinks, toilets and washing machines.

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Planning round-up 4 August 2016

planning

Welsh power line project. North west National Parks extend. New Welsh regime for major development kicks-in. Northern Enterprise Zone progress. Welwyn Garden City new homes. And more stories…

Welsh power line project

Greg Clark, the new business and energy secretary, has approved proposals for a new overhead power line scheme in North Wales.

The project, the subject of a Development Consent Order application, involves a new 132 kilovolt
link between Clocaenog Forest and St Asaph in Denbighshire.

Power Company SP Energy Networks proposed the scheme to connect a number of new wind farms to the area’s electricity distribution network.

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Planning Inspectorate insists appeal delays have been sorted

planning

The agency’s latest annual report acknowledges that in several areas of the planning appeals service the organisation fell short of meeting its targets…

Sarah Richards the new chief executive for the Planning Inspectorate (PINS) has insisted that the agency is “well advanced” with its actions designed to resolve the problems faced by some customers who experienced significant delays with PINS appeals service during the last financial year, 2015/16.

In the Inspectorate’s latest annual report, just published, the chief executive admitted “in several areas of our planning appeals service, we fell well short of our targets, and in many cases, our customers experienced significant delays”.

Richards argued that PINS did the right thing by admitting these failings publicly. “We are well advanced with the actions needed to resolve the problems. We have made progress, but there’s more to do”.

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Minister urged to clarify government intentions over local plans

planning

MPs call on the planning minister to set out how the new administration proposes to reform the legislative and local plan making process…

Clive Betts MP, chair of the Commons Communities and Local Government Committee has put the new planning minister Gavin Barwell on the spot over the new administration’s legislative and local plan reform proposals.

Betts has written to Barwell asking if the yet to be introduced neighbourhood planning and infrastructure bill will be published in draft form initially and whether the department plans to use the legislation to bring in changes to the local plan regime in line with the recommendations of the expert group’s report.

In the letter Betts wanted to know if the new planning minister intends to follow his predecessors’ intention to intervene in the production of local plans where councils do not have them in place by March 2017.

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Retirement housing shortage quantified

planning

New report shows an increasing gap in the supply of retirement housing with an estimated shortage of 376,000 housing units by 2050…

A new report has highlighted a shortage of around 160,000 retirement housing units by 2030 for England’s increasingly elderly UK population.

That’s the assessment of the International Longevity Centre – UK (ILC-UK) in its latest ‘State of the Nation’s Housing’ report. If current trends continue by 2050 that gap could grow to 376,000, the organisation has estimated.

The report noted that the rate of construction of new housing for older people has varied over the years, peaking in 1989 at 30,000 units. But since then the rate has fallen away dramatically and has averaged around 7,000 new units a year over the last decade.

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Planning round-up 28 July 2016

planning

Makeover for UK’s first pedestrianised precinct. Development Consent Order granted for Potash project’s harbour facilities. Retail activity dips. Devolution housing deals assessment. And more stories.

Makeover for UK’s first pedestrianised precinct

Architect Sheppard Robson has submitted plans to Tower Hamlets Council to create a mixed-use scheme to reinvigorate Chrisp Street Market in Poplar east London, part of which was the UK’s first-ever pedestrianised shopping precinct.

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New Communities Secretary and planning minister announced

planning

Sajid Javid replaces Clark as Communities Secretary and Gavin Barwell takes over from Lewis as planning and housing minister in the new Cabinet and ministerial team…

New PM Teresa May has announced her first Cabinet and ministerial team which means the new Communities Secretary is former Business Secretary Sajid Javid while Croydon Central MP Gavin Barwell, has become planning and housing minister as well taking responsibility for issues in the capital.

His predecessor Brandon Lewis has moved to the Home Office while Lewis’s erstwhile boss Greg Clark has become Secretary of State at the newly minted

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Latest updated housing projection estimates published

planning

Updated 2014-based sub-national household projections published by the Office for National Statistics and the Department for Communities and Local Government…

The latest updated household projection figures for England which will provide a new ‘starting point’ when establishing the objectively assessed need (OAN) for housing in local plans has been published by the Office for National Statistics and the Department for Communities and Local Government.

Across England, the 2014-based SNHP show that 210,000 households will form every year until 2039. This highlights the widely acknowledged gap between the level of housing projected to be needed and new housing completions across England. The projections illustrate that this gap between the homes that are needed and those delivered is significant and shows no signs of abating, commented planning consultancy Turley.

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National Audit Office queries public sector land disposal progress

planning

Report finds that the Department for Communities and Local Government has, at most, achieved eight per cent of its overall commitment to dispose of enough public sector land for 160,000 homes by 2020.

The Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) has made progress in setting up its new programme to release enough public sector land for 160,000 homes by 2020, but so far only land with capacity for an estimated 8,580 homes has been disposed of, according to the latest assessment by the National Audit Office.

The public spending watchdog has acknowledged that the department has committed to monitoring the progress of land development including the number of homes built, a subject of past criticism by the NAO.

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Planning round-up 21 July 2016

planning

Liverpool snubs UNESCO request over World Heritage site. Park homes boost? Peers criticise government housing policy . Maidenhead moves to boost housing. And more stories…

Liverpool snubs UNESCO request over World Heritage site

Liverpool City Council has given the cold shoulder to a recommendation from UNESCO that there should be a moratorium on new development within the city’s world heritage site and the surrounding buffer zone. Mayor Joe Anderson has said he will write to the UN body rejecting its request.

A council spokesman said: “We work extremely hard to balance conservation with the development needs of a growing city, and UNESCO recognises we have made progress in addressing their concerns.

 “The number of buildings in Liverpool on the at-risk register is at a 25 year low and Historic England says the city is an example of best practice nationally.

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Requirement to consider the nationally described space standard

nationally described space

The North Northants Joint Core Strategy has now adopted the nationally described space standard which requires specific housing consideration. This contains policy relative to minimum dwelling sizes across private and affordable house types.

This affects the borough council areas of Kettering, Wellingborough, Corby and East Northants.

This standard deals with internal space within new dwellings and is suitable for application across all tenures. It sets out requirements for the Gross Internal (floor) Area of new dwellings at a defined level of occupancy as well as floor areas and dimensions for key parts of the home, notably bedrooms, storage and floor to ceiling height.

The requirements of this standard for bedrooms, storage and internal areas are relevant only in determining compliance with this standard in new dwellings and have no other statutory meaning or use.

 

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Committee on Climate Change highlights the risks of global warming

planning

New report details the evidence of the most urgent risks facing the UK, and suggests priorities for the next five years…

The Government’s official advisers on global warming have called for urgent action on flooding, dealing with deadly heat waves and facing up to water shortages.

Those issues were highlighted in the latest report from the independent Committee on Climate Change which assesses climate-related risks.

Changes to the UK climate are likely to include periods of too much or too little water, increasing average and extreme temperatures, and a rise in sea level. The report concluded that the most urgent risks for the UK resulting from these changes are:

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Planning round-up 7 July 2016

planning

Milton Keynes 2050 vision. Lincolnshire Lakes development mooted as a ‘Garden City’. Latest stats on home approvals. Local plan round-up. RTPI bursary initiative. And more stories…

Milton Keynes 2050 vision

By 2050 Milton Keynes could be home to 400,000 residents and recognised internationally as a centre of learning and innovation at the heart of a cluster of high-performing universities in the Cambridge- Milton Keynes-Oxford Arc leading the UK’s bid to compete for the advanced industries driving global economic growth.

That’s the prospect held out by a report published this week by a commission of independent experts who have been considering what sort of city MK could become by 2050.

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Brexit won’t mean bonfire of EU green regulations insist lawyers

planning

Lawyers and ecologists say that EU directives and European-derived regulations that relate to wildlife protection and air quality limits are likely to remain in place despite the referendum outcome…

Lawyers insisted this week that despite the result of the EU referendum, developers would still have to comply with European-derived regulations which augment the planning system like environmental impact assessment (EIA), air quality limits and habitats protection.

“Many of these will be extremely difficult to unpick, and some reflect international treaty obligations, so are likely to remain, even when the UK finally leaves” said Angus Walker, a senior partner at law firm BDB.

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North Northamptonshire joint development plan passes muster

planning

Inspector’s report published concluding that, subject to modifications, the North Northamptonshire Joint Planning Unit’s Joint Core Strategy is “sound”…

The joint core strategy and local plan for four borough and district councils in north Northamptonshire, together with the county council, has been signed off as sound by the planning inspector who examined the strategy, albeit with certain provisos.

A key issue is the requirement that the councils must put in place a mechanism for monitoring housing delivery which will instigate a review should proposed sustainable urban extension (SUE) fail to match expectations in the plan. This covers the areas administered by the Corby, East Northamptonshire, Kettering and Wellingborough local authorities.

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Minsters publish new garden settlement prospectus

planning

Further guidance published for the government’s Locally-Led Garden Villages, Towns and Cities scheme stressing the importance of community support for proposals…

The government has published its prospectus for a new wave of garden settlements. Ministers are stressing that these new garden villages and towns must be locally led, must provide for ‘starter homes’ and must establish “a clear and distinct sense of identity”.

The prospectus emphasised that the government is not looking to support places “which merely use ‘garden’ as a convenient label”.

It added: “We do not want to impose a set of development principles on local areas. But we will want to see evidence of attractive, well designed places with local support”.

The first part of the prospectus has invited expressions of interest by the end of next month for new garden villages of between 1,500 and 10,000 new homes. At this stage ministers are expecting to support up to 12 proposals.

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Planning round-up 23 June 2016

planning

Latest quarterly planning application figures. Inquiry into M4 extension around Newport announced. Builders warn of capacity constraints to meet new homes targets. And more stories…

Latest quarterly planning application figures

Between January to March 2016, district level planning authorities in England received 119,700 applications for planning permission, down one per cent on the corresponding quarter of 2015 and granted 86,200 decisions, up three per cent from the same quarter last year.

They decided 82 per cent of major applications within 13 weeks or the agreed time, up from 77 per cent a year earlier, and granted 11,300 residential applications, down one per cent on a year earlier.

Some 9,000 applications for prior approval for permitted development rights were received during January to March 2016, up six per cent from the same quarter of 2015. Of those applications 7,400 were approved without having to go through the full planning process, up seven per cent on a year earlier.

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MPs criticise government’s flooding strategy

planning

Environment audit committee report urges the government to take a more proactive approach to managing flood risk…

MPs have criticised the government for a lack of a long-term strategy to deal with flooding and urged ministers to ensure better monitoring of planning conditions for schemes allowed in flood risk areas.

Those were two of the key points made in a report about flooding published by the Commons Environmental Audit Committee.

The all-party committee noted that some 10,000 homes were built in high flood-risk areas during 2013-14 but warned there were no comprehensive statistics detailing if the schemes were built according to conditions.

The MPs want the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the Department for Communities and Local Government to establish a systematic approach to recording whether schemes met their conditions.

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Ministers insist new bill won’t curtail archaeological activity

planning

Petition sparked by fears that the neighbourhood planning and infrastructure bill will curtail the use of planning conditions requiring archaeological activity and surveys…

The government has insisted that measures in its yet-to-be published flagship neighbourhood planning and infrastructure bill will not curtail the use of planning conditions requiring archaeological surveys.

That’s the fear of some conservation and archaeological interests and professionals. This concern triggered a petition which generated 17,553 on-line signatories.

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Planning round-up 16 June 2016

planning

Dark skies. Leeds housing allowed on appeal. Report calls for older person priorities in local plans. Oxfordshire and Kent local plan developments. Wolverhampton station development. And more stories.

Dark skies

The most detailed ever satellite maps of England’s dark skies have been released by the Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE)

They show that the Isles of Scilly, West Devon and Eden in Cumbria are England’s darkest districts and that the very darkest spot in England is a secluded hillside on the East Kielder Moors in Northumberland.

CPRE’s interactive maps also show where light pollution is most invasive. Nineteen of the brightest 20 skies are above London boroughs, while Manchester is the only non-London district in the top 20. The very brightest spot is above a Tata Steel foundry in Rotherham, followed by the Thanet Earth greenhouse complex in Kent and the space around Wembley Stadium in London.

Nationwide, the maps show that just 22 per cent of England is untouched by light pollution, and that 53 per cent of the darkest skies are over National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Northumberland National Park enjoys 96 per cent pristine night skies, while the South Downs, granted Dark Sky Reserve status in May 2016, is London’s closest expanse of dark skies.

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Oxford publishes report which ‘justifies’ green belt urban extensions

planning

Council report calls for a review of Oxford’s green belt inner boundaries to allow strategic housing allocations…

Oxford City Council has published a new report which supports its case that its unmet housing need is best addressed through urban extensions closest to the city involving the loss of some existing green belt.

The local authority said the report, commissioned from planning consultancy Turley, provided evidence of the exceptional circumstances justifying the need for a review of the inner boundaries of the green belt to allow strategic housing allocations on the edge of the University City.

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Planning round-up 9 June

planning

Salford Quays set to double up. Teesside regeneration report. Pig farmers pan planning. Go-ahead for Nottinghamshire waste gasification facility. And more stories…

Dark skies

The most detailed ever satellite maps of England’s dark skies have been released by the Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE)

They show that the Isles of Scilly, West Devon and Eden in Cumbria are England’s darkest districts and that the very darkest spot in England is a secluded hillside on the East Kielder Moors in Northumberland.

CPRE’s interactive maps also show where light pollution is most invasive. Nineteen of the brightest 20 skies are above London boroughs, while Manchester is the only non-London district in the top 20. The very brightest spot is above a Tata Steel foundry in Rotherham, followed by the Thanet Earth greenhouse complex in Kent and the space around Wembley Stadium in London.

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Reserved matters planning permission obtained.

S:CORPORATE CLIENTSOrbitLLC 985 Lower Street Hillmorton, Rugb

RDC have obtained reserved matters planning permission for 76 new homes at Lower Street, Hillmorton, Rugby on behalf of Orbit Homes 2020 ltd.

76 new homes on the site, which has been redundant for almost 30 years, would include a mix of homes including  two bedrooms, three bedrooms and with four or more bedrooms of affordable tenure and open market.

Planning round-up 2 June 2016

planning

New Homes Bonus allocations. National Infrastructure Assessment. Scottish planning review. Housing completions. Manchester housing schemes. Green energy project determinations. And more stories…

New Homes Bonus allocations

The government has announced New Homes Bonus grant allocations worth over £1.46bn for 2016/17.

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Latest population projections published

planning

The Office for National Statistics latest population projections indicate a larger and increasingly ageing UK population…

The ONS has published its 2014-based Population Projections and the accompanying Sub-National Population Projections.

These indicate a larger and increasingly ageing UK population compared to the 2012 projections. The fastest projected growth is in London, the South East and the East of England regions. Assumed net migration accounts for 51 per cent of the increase.

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Planning round-up 20 May 2016

planning

A14 upgrade consented. Legislation changes big onshore wind farm planning regime. Developers pledge to boost home delivery. And more stories…

A14 upgrade consented

Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin has approved the Development Consent Order for a 34 kilometre section of the A14 between Cambridge and Huntingon.

The Highways England scheme includes the widening of the A1 between Brampton and Alconbury; a new Huntingdon Southern Bypass; downgrading of the existing A14 trunk road between Brampton Hut and Swavesey to county road status; demolition of the A14 viaduct and the construction of a new link road in Huntingdon.

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Majority of councils say NPPF viability test hinders affordable homes provision

planning

New report shows only seven per cent of councils believe that the government’s starter homes initiative would help address their affordable housing need…

Nearly three-quarters of councils (72 per cent) believe the viability test in the National Planning Policy Framework hinders their ability to provide social and affordable housing, research has highlighted.

Only 11 per cent of those surveyed for a report on housing need published by the Association for Public Service Excellence (APSE) and the Town and Country Planning Association (TCPA) considered that the test would provide the numbers of homes needed.

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Queen’s Speech promises a neighbourhood planning and infrastructure bill

planning

21 new bills announced to help simplify planning rules and support the government’s ambition to deliver one million new homes…

The government this week promised a neighbourhood planning and infrastructure bill, one of 21 in the upcoming legislative programme set out in Wednesday’s Queen’s Speech.

This bill will support the government’s ambition to “deliver one million new homes, whilst protecting those areas that we value most including the Green Belt”.

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Proposal for 2,800 new homes on Green Belt near Redditch

planning

Green Belt residential development plans submitted for 136-hectare site…

Real estate consultancy Bilfinger GVA has submitted a duplicate planning application to Bromsgrove District Council and Redditch Borough Council for a new settlement of 2,800 homes at a Green Belt location currently in agricultural use.

The 136-hectare site is adjacent to the suburb of Webheath, some 1.5 miles from Redditch town centre.

Both the planning authorities are supporting the removal of the land from the Green Belt in order to support cross-boundary growth. The consultancy said the scheme is in line with their housing needs and would help meet the “duty to co-operate” requirements of the National Planning Policy Framework.

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Parliamentary deadlock over housing and planning bill nearly over

planning

Housing and planning bill nears completion of its legislative journey. Update: The Lords did not insist on its final proposed amendment, Royal Assent is scheduled for today (12 May)…

The Lords did not insist on its final proposed amendment over the regime for the sale of higher-value council homes. After MPs voted to reject the amendment, Lord Kerslake withdrew it in the Lords debate yesterday afternoon (11 May). This means the bill is now set for the final stage of Royal Assent when the bill will become an Act of Parliament. Royal Assent is scheduled today (12 May).

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Latest figures show housing permissions on the rise

planning

Housing Pipeline report identifies increase in number of private housing units approved as main driver…

Planning permission for 255,032 new homes was granted in England in 2015 – up 57 per cent from a low point of 162,204 in 2009 according to the latest Housing Pipeline report from the Home Builders Federation (HBF) and industry data collector Glenigan

The 74,759 permissions granted in the final quarter of 2015 were up 13 per cent on the same quarter in 2014 as developers submitted more applications to ensure they can continue to deliver further increases in supply.

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New £1bn funding package for housing launched

planning

New Communities Partnership unveiled, while new report finds that 6 per cent of land in England and Wales is in public ownership…

A £1bn housing delivery fund, the ‘New Communities Partnership’, has been launched to help the public sector build 10,000 new homes across the UK over the next 4 to 5 years.

This initiative brings together Kier Living, The Cheyne Social Property Impact Fund (managed by UK-based investment manager Cheyne Capital) and The Housing Growth Partnership (a joint venture between the Homes and Communities Agency and Lloyds Banking Group).

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Planning round-up 28 April 2016

planning

PAS grant cut by cash-strapped DCLG. Social housing funding boost. Rushden Lakes new development. Ipswich core strategy review makes progress. And more stories…

PAS grant cut by cash-strapped DCLG

The Department for Communities and Local Government has halved its grant to the Planning Advisory Service (PAS) for the current financial year, 2016/17. This move was confirmed in a letter to the Local Government Association which administers the service.

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CPRE reports that Green Belt development is on the up

planning

Latest research from the Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE) has identified that 275,000 houses are now planned for England’s Green Belt.

The figures show an increase of 50,000 houses on last year and nearly 200,000 houses more than when the government introduced its planning reforms in March 2012.

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Key Appeal Court ruling on Green Belt appropriate development

planning

This followed a case involving a proposal to extend a nursery with a large glasshouse covering some 92,000 square metres located within the Lee Valley Regional Park on the north-eastern flank of Greater London. Valley Grown Nurseries planned to use the glasshouse to grow tomatoes and peppers.

The site in question was in Green Belt and less than a kilometre from the Lee Valley Special Protection Area (SPA) and Ramsar site. Permission for the scheme was given by Epping Forest District Council.

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Peers inflict more changes to housing and planning bill

planning

The housing and planning bill is facing the prospect of prolonged parliamentary cross-fire as peers pushed through further amendments resisted by ministers during report stage in the Lords.

The bill was due its third reading in the upper chamber this week (27 April).

The latest crop of changes insisted on by peers included a provision that local authorities could require affordable housing provision on some small-scale developments in certain rural areas.

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Full Plans Approval from Mid Suffolk District Council

RDC have now received Full Plans Approval from Mid Suffolk District Council for Phase 1 of the Orbit Homes development at Great Blakenham. This development is for 265 new dwellings and Commercial Buildings.

Kier Living achieve Reserved Matters Planning Approval for 162 new homes

Kier LLC993-110E

RDC have recently assisted Kier Living in achieving Reserved Matters Planning Approval for 162 new homes at the Priors Hall development near Corby. The scheme provides for a range of new homes from 2 bedroom apartments to 4 bedroom detached properties in a selection of characters and styles.

Miller Homes loses appeal over residential development

planning

Developer Miller Homes has lost its appeal over a residential development of 80 homes at the Northamptonshire hill-top village of West Haddon because the outline proposals were not sustainable in environmental terms and – significantly – the project risked undermining the relevant neighbourhood plan.

Communities Secretary Greg Clark has agreed with the planning inspector who held the recovered appeal hearing that the scheme, which included new access and open space, landscaping and drainage infrastructure, should be refused.

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Relaxed planning rules covering the construction of low cost starter homes

planning

Relaxed planning rules covering the construction of low cost ‘starter homes’ for local residents could be extended to rural towns and villages in England as part of plans to boost the rural economy which also include moves to make neighbourhood planning more straightforward.

Last week the Treasury and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs unveiled a package of proposals aimed at boosting rural productivity.

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Call for flexible CIL charges to help small builders

planning

A new report commissioned by the Federation of Small Business (FSB) suggests local planning authorities could inadvertently be costing small house builders millions of pounds because of Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) charges. The FSB argues these extra costs risk blocking otherwise viable housing projects.

The FSB commissioned an assessment by BCIS, the building cost information service run by professional body RICS. BCIS found that on average, smaller house building projects of 10 units or less, typical of developments run by smaller firms, had significantly higher basic building costs.

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Judge quashes government policy on affordable housing exemption thresholds

planning

Two Berkshire councils have won a landmark High Court challenge over government policy brought in last November which set a threshold on the size of developments beneath which planning authorities should not seek affordable housing contributions through section 106 agreements.

That has now been quashed as has the vacant building credit policy. Under those provisions affordable housing requirements were reduced according to the extent to which a housing proposal involved the re-use or redevelopment of vacant buildings.

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